VERMICULITE REMOVAL

Since some vermiculite is hazardous and others are not, hire a professional to inspect and handle removal.

Identifying Vermiculite

According to the United States Geology Survey (USGS) Vermiculite insulation is no longer used in new construction, but an estimated one million homes in the U.S. still have it. In an unprecedented situation, a town that was known for mining vermiculite for over 50 years had several hundred cases of death and illness caused by the vermiculite. In the aftermath, United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ended all mining and started cleanup of the area. By 2002, the EPA declared the site a public emergency and a federal priority.

 

According to the United States Geology Survey (USGS) Vermiculite insulation is no longer used in new construction, but an estimated one million homes in the U.S. still have it. In an unprecedented situation, a town that was known for mining vermiculite for over 50 years had several hundred cases of death and illness caused by the vermiculite. In the aftermath, United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ended all mining and started cleanup of the area. By 2002, the EPA declared the site a public emergency and a federal priority.

What is Vermiculite?

Vermiculite is loose-fill insulation that’s resistant to fire and chemical corrosion, and makes for an excellent insulating material. Most of the worlds vermiculite supply, a product called Zonolite, came from the Libby Montana mine.

Where is it Found?

Vermiculite was a popular material used in residential homes and commercial buildings. It was most commonly used in attic spaces and hollow masonry construction (i.e. cinder block walls).

Why Remove it?

The asbestos fibres found in most vermiculite, called tremolite, is particularly dangerous due to its physical properties and how easily it can become airborne. EXTREME CAUTION and CARE should be taken when removing vermiculite from any space.

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